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dc.contributor.advisorSynoground, Gail
dc.creatorElledge, Melinda C.
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-24T17:52:43Z
dc.date.available2012-07-24T17:52:43Z
dc.date.issued7/24/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4014
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Nurs.), College of Nursing, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractSmoking during pregnancy significantly increases health risks for both the woman and her fetus and causes 20% to 30% of the low birthweight rate and 10% of the infant mortality rate in the United States. Although there has been a decline in overall smoking prevalence in recent years, and an increasing tendency for women to quit smoking during pregnancy, 20% to 25% of pregnant women in this country still do smoke throughout their pregnancy. Smoking cessation interventions based on the Transtheoretical Model and matched to the smoker's stages of change have shown effectiveness in clinical studies with other diverse popUlations, but have not been widely studied with pregnant smokers. The purpose of my investigative paper is to discover what smoking cessation interventions have been utilized with pregnant women, and to determine if the Transtheoretical Model could be effectively applied to them.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us
dc.titleCan the Transtheoretical Model Be Applied to Smoking Cessation Interventions With Pregnant Women?
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)