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dc.creatorQuigley, T.M.
dc.creatorHayes, J.L.
dc.creatorStarr, L.
dc.creatorDaterman, G.E.
dc.date.accessioned2007-08-20T23:36:18Z
dc.date.available2007-08-20T23:36:18Z
dc.date.issued2001
dc.identifier.issn0029-344X
dc.identifier.otherSpecial issue: Forest health and productivity in eastern Oregon and Washingtonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/999
dc.description.abstractForest health and productivity decline in eastern Oregon and Washington, USA has resulted in risks to products, economies, and amenities that are deemed unacceptable to many residents and non-residents. Information and management tools exist that will assist managers in improving conditions, but what is needed is a framework for integrating the available models and information. Steps in developing such a framework include: establishing goals consistent across scales, assessing current conditions and risks, developing management options, describing outcomes of options, selecting an option, establishing priorities for action, implementing those priority activities, and monitoring and evaluating the results of actions. Research projects undertaken by the Forest Health and Productivity Initiative of the Pacific Northwest Research Station include collaboration with managers to develop options for managing insect, disease, and fire disturbances in order to improve ecosystem integrity, to integrate biophysical and socioeconomic considerations, to identify linkages across scales, and to fill significant knowledge gaps at the mid or broad scale. Science can contribute basic understanding of resource conditions and interactions, models to assess risk and opportunities, models that predict future conditions, and options regarding future management actions. The ability to implement actions to achieve improved forest health and productivity depends on the availability of resources to plan and implement actions, the financial feasibility of individual practices on individual sites, the motivation of resource specialists and the public to undertake the actions, and acceptance by the public, interest groups, agencies, and policy makers of the mix of management actions proposed.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherWSU Press
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectecological disturbanceen_US
dc.subjectendangered speciesen_US
dc.subjectforest healthen_US
dc.subjectforest managementen_US
dc.subjectforest pestsen_US
dc.subjectforestsen_US
dc.subjectfungal diseasesen_US
dc.subjecthabitatsen_US
dc.subjectinsect controlen_US
dc.subjectinsect pestsen_US
dc.subjectpest controlen_US
dc.subjectplant disease-controlen_US
dc.subjectplant pestsen_US
dc.subjectproductivityen_US
dc.subjectsocioeconomicsen_US
dc.titleImproving forest health and productivity in Eastern Oregon and Washington
dc.typeText
dc.description.citationQuigley et al "Improving forest health and productivity in Eastern Oregon and Washington." Northwest Science. 2001; 75(Special issue): 234-251


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  • Northwest Science
    Northwest Science features original research in the basic and applied sciences, with emphasis on the Pacific Northwest region of the United States and Canada.

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