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dc.creatorBridgewater, Rachel
dc.creatorBorrelli, Steve
dc.date.accessioned2008-04-21T21:10:31Z
dc.date.available2008-04-21T21:10:31Z
dc.date.issued2008-04-21T21:10:31Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/1382
dc.description.abstractOver the past couple of years, social software like blogs, wikis, tagging, podcasting, and the like have moved out of hands of early adopters, into the mainstream, and, increasingly, into our libraries. Should your library have a blog? Is there a way to enhance your reference services with instant messaging? Would MySpace or Facebook help you with outreach to teens and students? Could a wiki replace your procedures manual? Can RSS help you keep up? This hands-on session will give you the tools you need to evaluate these and other technologies to determine if they have a role to play in your library. We'll also give you all the skills you need to get started if you decide to start using one of these tools. This session will emphasize the practical, while providing ample opportunity for discussion of the "big issues" raised by these technologies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInland Northwest Council of Librariesen
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
dc.subjectweb 2.0
dc.subjectread/write
dc.subjectwiki
dc.subjectblog
dc.subjectsocial network
dc.subjectFacebook
dc.subjectRSS
dc.titleUnderstanding the Read/ Write Web
dc.typePresentation
dc.typeText


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    This collection features scholarly material created by Steve Borrelli, Strategic Assessment Librarian at Washington State University.

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported (CC BY-NC 3.0)