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dc.creatorDuPont, S. Tianna
dc.creatorHewavitharana, Shashika Shivanthi, 1985-
dc.creatorMazzola, Mark, 1960-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-03T22:26:14Z
dc.date.available2019-04-03T22:26:14Z
dc.date.issued2019-02
dc.identifier.other(OCoLC)1091373581
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/14221
dc.description.abstractPhytophthora rots can girdle the scion (collar rot), damage the rootstock just below the soil surface (crown rot), and cause necrosis and death of fine roots (root rot). While generally considered a larger problem in rain-fed growing regions with heavy soils, Phytophthora problems occur in Washington, especially where irrigation water carries the pathogen or where irrigation and overhead cooling practices create wet soil conditions for extended periods. Multiple species of Phytophthora have been implicated in crop damage with P. cactorum and P. syringae two of the more significant species. P. cambivora and P. citricola have also been isolated in Washington from symptomatic trees.
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherPullman, Washington : Washington State University Extension
dc.relation.ispartofseriesFact sheet (Washington State University. Extension) ; 322E
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWSU Tree Fruit IPM Strategies (Washington State University. Extension)
dc.subject.lcsh
dc.subject.lcshPhytophthora.
dc.subject.lcshApples--Diseases and pests.
dc.subject.lcshCherry--Diseases and pests.
dc.titlePhytophthora crown, collar, and root rot of apple and cherry
dc.typeText


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