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dc.contributor.advisorSchumann, Lorna
dc.creatorMcLaughlin, Brea
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-06T18:52:43Z
dc.date.available2012-11-06T18:52:43Z
dc.date.issued11/6/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4193
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Nurs.), College of Nursing, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractChronic pain is increasingly common in the primary care setting. It is therefore essential for primary care nurse practitioners to be confident managing and treating patients with chronic non-cancer-related pain. One hundred people die every day from drug overdoses in the United States and a majority of these deaths are from prescription drugs. Using the Chronic Care Model as a guiding framework, this paper evaluates the literature to identify evidence-based elements that should be included in a pain management agreement for patients being treated for chronic, non-cancer pain. Pain agreements, while not completely studied for effectiveness and outcomes, are commonly used in primary care settings when opioids are prescribed for patients with chronic pain. Pain agreements between primary care nurse practitioners and patients generally include urine drug screening, assessments to identify psychological comorbidities and Morphine Equivalent Dosing. More research on the impact of pain agreements on patient outcomes is needed.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us
dc.subjectchronic pain, nurse practitioners, pain agreements contracts
dc.titleChronic Pain Agreements
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)