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dc.contributor.advisorSchumann, Lorna
dc.creatorSchoenberger, Todd M.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-06T22:56:01Z
dc.date.available2012-11-06T22:56:01Z
dc.date.issued11/6/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4215
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Nurs.), College of Nursing, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractCardiovascular disease accounts for nearly half of the deaths in developed countries. For many who die from cardiovascular disease, the onset is sudden, with rapid progression to a lethal dysrhythmia, only treatable by rapid access to defibrillation. For others, the signs and symptoms are unrecognized or ignored. Despite the resources dedicated to awareness and treatment of heart disease by large organizations, such as the American Heart Association, many who are experiencing the signs and symptoms of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) do not seek immediate treatment. This literature review will investigate the reasons why men, specifically, delay seeking treatment for ACS. Four themes emerged, which partially explain some of the challenges that men face when experiencing symptoms of ACS. These themes are non-health-seeking behavior, knowledge deficit/self-diagnosis, presence of external modifiers, and choice of action. This study will include these four themes in a modified version of the Health Belief Model in an effort to predict health seeking behavior of men. Finally, implications for practice and suggestions for further research, based on the results of the review, will be provided.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us
dc.titleMen's Reluctance to Seek Care for Acute Coronary Syndromes
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)