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dc.contributor.advisorSchumann, Lorna
dc.creatorRoby, Amanda D.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-06T23:10:27Z
dc.date.available2012-11-06T23:10:27Z
dc.date.issued11/6/2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/4217
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Nurs.), College of Nursing, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractMore than 900,000 total hip and knee replacement surgeries are performed in the United States annually. Of this number, it is estimated that 1 to 5% of total hip and knee arthroplasties will become infected. Such infections have costly consequences for the United States and for patients both financially and physically. Many methods for prevention of surgical site infection have been researched. Such methods include operative suite airflow and ultraviolet radiation, surgical personnel hygiene, barriers, and behaviors, as well as pre-operative preparation of the surgical client to include management of co-morbidities, antibiotic therapy and preparation of the surgical site. This paper explores these various methods for prevention of infection in total joint arthroplasty and more specifically of primary total knee and total hip arthroplasties and identifies the best practices.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us
dc.titlePrevention of Surgical Site Infection in Primary Total Joint Arthroplasty
dc.typeText
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.typeResearch Project


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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US)