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dc.contributor.advisorEricsson, Patricia F.
dc.contributor.advisorVillanueva, Victor
dc.creatorPlemons, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-11T17:11:35Z
dc.date.available2014-09-11T17:11:35Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/5083
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.), Department of English, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractWalter Mignolo suggests a fused relationship between modernity and coloniality. I suggest that prison writing sponsorship carries the possibility of this coloniality in the ways that sponsors account for and justify programs. Specifically, I suggest that the way scholars use student texts assumes a modernistic fixity that may not be there. In response to this critique, I provide a theoretical lens for looking at the prison writing classroom that suggests that both the writing communities and the texts they create are inherently organic and might not be measurable, package-able, and exportable in they ways we want them to be.This remixed theory brings together grammatology, ecosocial theory, and actor network theory, each of which operates on the assumption that a fundamental instability underlies relationships between people and things in their networks. Taken together, these theories help describe the messy, complicated, and contingent work being done by prison writing communities and lead me to assert that such communities stand to lose when program sponsors dictate the type of work being done, and/or require explicit or implicit evidence of transformation from program participants. Whereas the aforementioned theories work to disrupt a modernistic paradigm for understanding and evaluating prison writing programs, indigenous methodologies open up possible decolonial options for thinking about how we construct, and carry out, acts of sponsorship and research in the prison system. The theory and praxis suggested in this text makes use of the particular history of Arts in Corrections at New Folsom, the maximum-security prison where I have been a guest teacher in the classrooms of two incarcerated teaching artists, both of whom are serving life without parole sentences. In the interplay between theories that speak to the instability of things and methodologies that privilege relationality and relational accountability I offeren_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of English, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsPublicly accessible
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectHigher educationen_US
dc.subjectRhetoricen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectcolonialismen_US
dc.subjectcompositionen_US
dc.subjectDerridaen_US
dc.subjectliteracyen_US
dc.subjectprisonen_US
dc.subjectwritingen_US
dc.titleA Lingering Coloniality: Considering the Epistemic and Structural (Im)Possibilities of University-Sponsored Prison Writing Programs
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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