Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Darcy
dc.creatorAlrubaian, Abdullah Ali
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-02T18:43:52Z
dc.date.available2015-11-02T18:43:52Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/5428
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.), Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough Saudi Arabia has an inclusive classroom for students with learning disabilities (LDs) the general education teachers are not prepared to handle the special needs of the students with LDs. This study examined attitude, knowledge of evidence based practices, and perceived skills among the male general education teachers' teachers regarding LDs in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia using a mixed method study. Principals were also interviewed to corroborate data. Two-hundred and seventy-eight general education teachers participated on the online survey administered via Qualtrics and ten principals were interviewed in this study. The survey instrument was analyzed for validity and reliability. More than half the teachers currently had or previously had students with LDs. Teacher preparation, academic climate, teaching approaches, teaching strategies and teacher effectiveness were themes that emerged from factor analysis. The ANOVA test identified statistically significant relationships between-years of experience, degree field, and expertise in special education. The degree field, route of certification, expertise in special education, and having students with LDs in classroom was related to the teaching strategy employed by teachers. Teacher effectiveness was related to degree field, with expertise in special education and also with if they have had students with LDs. The academic climate in schools was enhanced by the presence of resource room. General education teachers had a positive attitude towards inclusion and provide multiple strategies for accommodating students with learning disabilities. Class size was considered critical by most general teachers when inclusion was being provided. Principals interviewed in this study reported that teachers had negative attitudes towards inclusion of students with LDs and believed that instructing students with LDs was no different from teaching regular students. Teachers desired smaller class sizes when they had students with LDs in their classrooms. Teachers who were currently were having students with LDs in the classroom requested more information on specialized teaching strategies, ways to individualize their instruction, and more information about accommodations to the curriculum. Teachers certified by traditional routes, requested more training regarding special education laws, asked for more information about accommodations to the curriculum, and sought more assistance in the classroom.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Special Education, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsNot publicly accessible
dc.rightsclosedAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess
dc.subjectSpecial educationen_US
dc.subjectEducationen_US
dc.subjectTeacher educationen_US
dc.subjectAttitudeen_US
dc.subjectInclusive educationen_US
dc.subjectKnowledgeen_US
dc.subjectLearning disabilitiesen_US
dc.subjectStrategiesen_US
dc.subjectTeachersen_US
dc.titleGENERAL EDUCATION TEACHERS' ATTITUDES, KNOWLEDGE, AND STRATEGIES RELATED TO TEACHING STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES IN SAUDI ARABIA
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record