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dc.creatorFarrior, Donna
dc.creatorHamill, William
dc.creatorKeiser, Leslie
dc.creatorKessler, Michael
dc.creatorLoPresti, Peter
dc.creatorMcCoy, Jerry
dc.creatorPomeranz, Shirley
dc.creatorPotter, William
dc.creatorTapp, Bryan
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-04T21:31:02Z
dc.date.available2015-11-04T21:31:02Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/5542
dc.description.abstractWe report on a two-year NSF-funded project to strengthen connections among science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. One component of this project was to produce some initial data on the effectiveness of Interdisciplinary Lively Applications Projects (ILAPs) in teaching science and engineering undergraduates. ILAPs are interdisciplinary group problem-solving projects, co-written by mathematics faculty and science/technology/engineering faculty. These small group projects are designed to foster student interest by being lively, real-world applications of mathematics in science and engineering. ILAPs are intended to assist students in learning to communicate across disciplines and in developing problem-solving skills. We summarize our development and use of ILAPs in the calculus courses and, in particular, describe our assessment data and results on the effectiveness of ILAPs in learning and related results.en_US
dc.languageEnglish
dc.publisherJournal of STEM Educationen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subjectInterdisciplinary Lively Applications Projects, STEM disciplinesen_US
dc.titleInterdisciplinary Lively Application Projects in Calculus Courses
dc.typeText
dc.description.citationDonna Farrior, William Hamill, Leslie Keiser, Michael Kessler, Peter LoPresti, Jerry McCoy, Shirley Pomeranz, William Potter, and Bryan Tapp: Interdisciplinary Lively Application Projects in Calculus Courses, Journal of STEM Education. 2007; 8(3-4), 50-62.


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  • Kessler, Michael
    This collection features research by Michael Kessler, professor in the School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Washington State University.

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Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International