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dc.creatorPremo, Luke
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-01T18:29:11Z
dc.date.available2015-12-01T18:29:11Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/5659
dc.description.abstractBenítez-Burraco & Barceló-Coblijn present some good reasons for showing caution before interpreting evidence for the introgression of DNA from “archaic” human populations, such as Neandertals and Denisovans, into anatomically modern humans (AMH) as evidence for the presence of language in the former. The reasons that I found most cogent are that (1) as we continue to learn more about AMH-specific substitutions we may find important differences in the regions of the genome that affect language, such as those recently reported for a regulatory element of the FOXP2 gene (Maricic et al., 2013), and (2) that differences between AMH and archaic humans in endocranial developmental trajectories (Gunz et al., 2012) may have affected the “linguistic phenotype” even if all of the populations shared the same underlying “linguistic genotype.”en_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.publisherJournal of Anthropological Sciencesen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectPleistoceneen_US
dc.subjectPaleoanthropologyen_US
dc.subjectLanguagesen_US
dc.titleWhat serves as evidence for the presence (or absence) of Pleistocene language?en_US
dc.typeText
dc.description.citationPremo, L. S. (2013) What serves as evidence for the presence (or absence) of Pleistocene language? Journal of Anthropological Sciences 91:257-259. Available at http://www.isita-org.com/jass/.


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  • Premo, Luke
    This collection features scholarly work by Luke Premo, assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at Washington State University.

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Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License 4.0
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