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dc.creatorTushingham, Shannon
dc.creatorBettinger, Robert L.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-15T22:36:36Z
dc.date.available2015-12-15T22:36:36Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/5765
dc.description.abstractSalmon and acorns were the most important terrestrial foods in the diet of contact period groups in northwestern California. Throughout the ethnography salmon is said to be the primary staple, while acorns come in a close second. Salmon are traditionally viewed as a low cost (high ranking) resource, while acorns are viewed as a high cost (low ranking) food. If correct, why are salmon not taken and stored en masse earlier?en_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.publisherProceedings of the Society for California Archaeologyen_US
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectArchaeologyen_US
dc.subjectHuman Behavioral Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Archaeologyen_US
dc.subjectHunting and gathering societiesen_US
dc.titleWhy Foragers Choose Acorns Before Salmon: Modeling Back-loaded Resources vs. Front-Loaded Resourcesen_US
dc.typeText
dc.description.citationTushingham, Shannon and Robert L. Bettinger. 2010. Why Foragers Choose Acorns Before Salmon: Modeling Back-loaded Resources vs. Front-Loaded Resources. Proceedings of the Society for California Archaeology 24.


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  • Tushingham, Shannon
    This collection features scholarly work by Shannon Tushingham, assistant director of the Museum of Anthropology at Washington State University.

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