Show simple item record

dc.creatorFalkenstern, Melissa Ann
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-15T20:53:38Z
dc.date.available2016-07-15T20:53:38Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/6191
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.), Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractPersonality has been found to significantly impact participation in psychological research in terms of time of participation (e.g., Aviv, Zelenski, Rallo, & Larsen, 2002), willingness to complete more difficult studies (e.g., Waite, Claffey, & Hillbrand, 1998), complete non-response (e.g., Pagan, Eaton, Turkheimer, & Oltmanns, 2006), and attrition (Norton, Booth, & Webster, 1976). The vast majority of this research was conducted on research paradigms typically used in social or personality psychology. This study sought to examine whether different personality factors predicted selection into and attrition from an intervention study when compared to a cognitive task or a one-time survey. Results suggest that personality did not predict self-selection into one of the three studies but that different personality traits predicted attrition based on the type of longitudinal study (i.e., task or intervention). Although personality factors did not predict self-selection, there were large differences in the number of participants in each study, suggesting that there is some sort of self-selection effect. The findings from this study are discussed in terms of their implications for research design and how we evaluate efficacy of interventions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Psychology - Clinical, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.rightsIn copyright
dc.rightsNot publicly accessible
dc.rightsclosedAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ndltd.org/standards/metadata
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/ClosedAccess
dc.subjectPsychologyen_US
dc.subjectAttritionen_US
dc.subjectClinical Interventionen_US
dc.subjectFive Factor Modelen_US
dc.subjectIndividual Differencesen_US
dc.subjectPersonalityen_US
dc.subjectResearch Participationen_US
dc.titleBig Five Factors and Longitudinal Research Participation
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record