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dc.creatorSchlanger, Sarah Helen
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-28
dc.date.available2007-03-28
dc.date.issued1/1/1980 0:00
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2376/770
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.), Anthropology, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.description.abstractA proposed index to population growth patterns is examined and found to be an unsatisfactory method for distinguishing between exponential and logistic growth trends thought to describe population growth in the American Southwest. The patterns formed by the beam cutting index at the sites studied by Eighmy are inferred to be a product of post-occupational site disturbance and sampling difficulties. An alternative approach derived from the properties of exponential and logistic population growth is outlined as a direction for further research.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDepartment of Anthropology, Washington State Universityen_US
dc.language.isoEnglish
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://purl.org/eprint/accessRights/OpenAccess
dc.subjectPopulation growthen_US
dc.subjectDendrochronologyen_US
dc.subjectCedar Mesa (San Juan County, Utah)en_US
dc.subjectPuebloen_US
dc.titleDemography and Dendrochronology: A Critical Examination of a Proposed Population Indexen_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesis or Dissertation


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  • Cedar Mesa Research Materials
    This collection includes theses, dissertations, publications, presentations, and other research materials related to the Cedar Mesa Project managed by William (Bill) Lipe and R.G. Matson.

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